Job Trends in times of Covid: the Emerging Labour Market

This entry was posted in Articles, Employment trends, JobisJob Data and tagged , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

The second wave of the coronavirus and the new restrictive measures are creating confusion and uncertainties in the job market. To combat that, your job search now has to be more accurate than ever before, based on job trends and data.

So don’t miss out on the opportunities that are emerging out there.

There’s still hope

While many jobs in the catering and hospitality sectors have been destroyed, some Health and Social Services positions are booming, followed by other industries like Logistics, Construction, and Education.

The powerful Job Market Insights tool based on big data allows us to discover the hottest job trends and the positions that are growing the most despite the crisis.

We have analysed the highest variations among the most in-demand job titles in the last six months compared to the same semester of 2019.

Healthcare and Social Services

Understandably, the Healthcare and Social Services job categories encompass most of the positions on the list due to the pandemic expansion.

All the nursing staff subcategories have experienced significant growth, including:

Other relevant medical related specialties include phlebotomists (it had a spectacular 29% increase), ward managers, pharmacists, occupational therapists, and disability assessors.

Mental health occupations are also expanding, from clinical psychologists to mental health nurses.

Social services positions have globally increased, including support workers, care home managers (21% increase) and care team leaders (30%), as well as children’s home managers.

Logistics and Distribution

The restriction measures and new consumption patterns have created a higher demand for logistic services. Distribution companies are now hiring more staff. Here is the list of the most in need positions in this sector:

Construction

While the whole job sector has experienced a relevant fall in new job offers, some specialties have grown. The biggest increase was observed for the following positions:

More job trends in other sectors

Teaching assistants, cover supervisors, and Learning support assistants are growing job opportunities in Education.

If you are searching for a position in Finance, take a look at mortgage advisor jobs, as we have observed more demand for professionals there.

Security worker jobs are also growing, especially retail security officers and security guards.

Domestic assistants, cleaners, and childcare assistants, nannies and tutors are also in demand.

_
Job trends in this article reflect the variation of job offers posted in the UK between March and September 2020 compared to the same period of 2019. Data was provided by Job Market Insights, the number one big data tool for the recruitment industry. Find more on www.jobmarketinsights.com.

3 Tips for Better Time Management Working from Home

This entry was posted in Uncategorized on by Andres Herrera.

According to statistics from LinkedIn, 82 percent of professionals would like to work from home one day a week or more, with 57 percent wanting to work from home three or more days.

COVID-19 has normalized remote work, and for many, it is more efficient. But there are some challenges that come with working remotely, not the least of which is time management.

Here are a few tips to make the most of your time when working from home:

Set Virtual Boundaries Between Work and Home

When working remotely, have a workspace away from the distractions of the rest of your home. Make sure you have everything you need to work within reach and good internet connectivity.

Try to stick to a set schedule. Allow for exceptions, of course, but try to guard against working around the clock.?

If possible, install Slack, Zoom, or whatever collaboration software your company uses, on your mobile phone. That way, even at the doctor’s office, you can respond to important messages, still be engaged, and get work done.

Turn off text messaging and personal email alerts while working remotely. They can distract you when working, and you want to make sure you stick with the schedule you set from beginning to end.?Even if you only glance at these mini-interruptions or just delete spam emails as they come through, that time adds up. Before you know it, you may have wasted an hour.

When it comes to personal issues at home, spend your time and attention wisely. Focus on the big picture first, and you can worry about the details as time permits.

Of course, get your work done completely and on time.

Take Care of Your Mental Health

When you take a remote work job, you should adjust your expectations of yourself, your family, and the people you work with.

Your workday won’t look the same as it does in an office setting. Don’t necessarily expect lots of feedback, the way a boss might be able to provide onsite. If you self-evaluate, you won’t have to spend time waiting for feedback.?

Make sure you get enough sleep and eat right, and plan meal times so they don’t become another distraction.

Do larger tasks first unless you feel like you need a break to avoid burnout, in which case do small or easier tasks first or take a break before you dive into work. Do as much prep work as you can before you start a project. That way when you actually do it, things will go more efficiently. Avoid the trap of trying to multitask, and don’t procrastinate. Reach out for assistance as needed. You still have supervisors and colleagues as resources to offer guidance and advice even if you work remotely.

Learn patience, too. What seems like an emergency project may turn out to be something that can wait.

Embrace interruptions. Sometimes they’re just what you need to give yourself a mental time out.

Above all, always be mindful, relax and laugh often. Working from home doesn’t mean you can’t have fun.

Allow Yourself Flexibility

Use your own to-do lists or organizational tools that work for you in addition to whatever workflow software your company uses. Set project goals for yourself, and be prepared for the interruptions and realities of life, which will be a lot closer to you when you work remotely.?

Don’t bug your supervisors, but let them know if you’re swamped, and ask for extensions as needed.

When stressful projects are postponed or a personal emergency is settled, take the time to relish in the relief. Don’t just move on to the next thing. Internalize it and let it help you enjoy working remotely from a deep place. Time management should automatically become easier.

When you tackle a project at home, break large tasks down into small chunks (this is advice for any project).

Do each portion, and when you’ve finished a few, or feel yourself losing steam, give yourself a break.

When you’re ready to work again, move on to the next portion. Before you know it, you’ll be done.

In Closing

Working from home can be great. But you need strong time management skills. Try to recreate the structure that comes with working onsite by limiting distractions and setting boundaries. Take care of your mental health and use whatever resources you have available to make your workload manageable.?

Above all, enjoy the freedom and perks of working remotely, and consider these tips so you can manage your time successfully.

Author:?Brad Wayland
_
Brad is a business consultant and the Chief Strategy Officer at BlueCotton, a site with high-quality, easy-to-design custom t-shirts.

What do Recruiters Look For on a Resume at the First Glance?

This entry was posted in Articles, CV writing and tagged , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

A resume is your representative or even an ambassador while applying for jobs. Hence, it’s most important to create a superb impression that can get you that interview call and possibly the job.

Therefore, here’s a vital question: What do recruiters look for on a resume at the first glance? What are the elements that should feature on a resume and how long your resume should be to attract employers?

Understandably, these may sound complex questions. However, with some effort, you can create a wonderful resume that actually catches the attention of recruiters at the very first glance.

resume writing

Photo by Magnet.me on Unsplash

What Recruiters Look on Resume at First Glance?

There’re five major elements of your resume that recruiters look for at the first glance. I’ll explain their relevance and how you can improve your resume to make it appealing.

1. Your Career Objective

There’s a huge debate among Human Resources circles whether a career objective on a resume is relevant or not in today’s era. Personally, I believe it is very relevant and important too. That’s because a well-written career objective actually leads a recruiter tor read the resume further.

Unfortunately, most jobseekers tend to write very uninspiring or vague career objectives, which can fit almost any entity for any job. This puts off recruiters. Hence, there’re very high chances your resume might get rejected merely because your career objective is poorly written.

A career objective is your personal vision and mission statement. It should clearly outline what’re your professional and personal goals in life. Yes, personal goals too. Because a career isn’t merely about a job. A career defines your whole lifestyle for a major part of your working life.

2. Skills

It’s worth remembering that skills are totally different from work experience. You might have several years of experience at a specific job. That doesn’t necessarily imply that you possess the skills that a new job requires. Therefore, one of the things that recruiters look on your resume at first glance is your skills that would prove useful to the business, if they hire you.

Therefore, before drafting a resume, the first thing to do is read the job post or job advert thoroughly. Comprehend what skills the recruiter is looking at and the nature of their business. And leverage your skills in line with the recruiter’s needs. Obviously, you won’t have all the skills that a recruiter requires. However, you can pitch as many skills as you have and point out their relevance to the recruiter’s business.

A common mistake that most jobseekers commit is to send a general resume to every recruiter. This doesn’t really entice a recruiter to shortlist you for an interview. Therefore, customizing a resume to suit the skills set required by a recruiter works wonders.

Also, include your soft skills because they matter a lot nowadays. Recruiters also look for desirable soft skills from a resume.

3. Career Graph

If you’re a fresher, the career graph doesn’t matter because you would be applying for the first job. However, do not forget to include any internships and traineeships that you’ve done while completing a course.

Secondly, also highlight any projects that you did while being a student or intern. These could be individual or group projects. The reason: projects speak volumes about your soft skills and aptitude for any specific job.

And for job seekers with some experience, recruiters look at your career graph for an altogether different reason. They wish to learn whether you’re progressing or stagnating in your career. However, a stagnant career graph isn’t something to worry about if that’s exactly the reason you’re looking for a career change.

If your career is going upwards, the recruiter would most likely be impressed and shortlist you for an interview call. That’s because career growth indicates you’re serious about your works and life and interested in the field.

4. Gaps between Jobs

Gaps between jobs on your resume are definitely something that catches the eye of a recruiter at the first glance. Because these gaps can indicate some serious flaws in your career. It indicates you’re changing jobs frequently and these could be due to negative reasons such as addictions, termination, and undesirable behavior, inability to get along with colleagues and seniors, or overall ineptitude, among others.

If you can genuinely justify gaps in your career, it’s fine. If not, never try to patch them up by giving false dates of leaving and joining any job. A simple Employee Background Screening (EBS) check will expose the truth. This can cost your job. Worse, it can create a very poor impression about you in the overall job market and several recruiters might not even consider you for employment, despite having all skills and qualifications.

Never fudge your resume to cover up gaps on your resume. If you’re asked to explain, provide the genuine reason without justifying yourself.

5. Professional & Social Affiliations

Your professional and social affiliations on a resume matter a lot. You could be a member of a professional guild or forum, alumni, social, or even sports and cultural organization. These affiliations always have a story to tell about you which a recruiter will try and grasp at the first glance.

For example, membership of a forum of professionals shows your interest in a specific field and career. It means, you have a vast resource of talent from where you could get ideas or solutions that might help your employer too, albeit indirectly. Membership of a social or cultural organization speaks of your personality traits.

At the same time, be a bit careful if you’re adding affiliations to any political or religious organizations. The employer may see things in a different light. While you can mention these political or religious affiliations casually, never use them to leverage your application for a job. That’s in very poor taste.

In Conclusion

If you pay attention to these five elements that recruiters look on a resume at the first glance, there’re high chances you might land an interview call. Also, I would suggest you read the difference between a curriculum vitae and a resume because the two are distinct and different documents.

Author: Natasha Shetty

How to Combat the Post-Holiday Blues

This entry was posted in Articles, Working life and tagged , , , on by Aina Ferretti.

Getting back to work after the holidays is not easy. Just the idea of returning to the usual routine can create a feeling of stress, sadness, irritability, or other mood swings. These are the first symptoms of the post-vacation syndrome, commonly known as post-holiday blues.

This syndrome is not officially recognized as an illness, but studies show that one in three people may suffer from it. In addition to psychological problems such as anxiety or lack of concentration, there are also physical symptoms such as sleep disorders, muscle aches, etc. This condition has been further aggravated this year by COVID-19 and the social isolation brought about by many of the consequent changes in our working conditions.

However, there is hope! Positive thinking, a positive attitude, and positive actions are great allies. Holidays give you the opportunity to relax and recharge your batteries. Use this energy to get back to work with a new, refreshed outlook.

post-holiday blues

5 tips on how to avoid or combat post-holiday blues

 

  1. Seek new goals. New challenges are great for renovating your enthusiasm!
  2. Get organized and schedule your week. You’ll feel more in control and this will reduce stress and contribute to your self-motivation.
  3. Practice sport. Stimulating the production of endorphins will help you feel good and keep the blues at bay.
  4. Watch your diet. Eat foods with serotonin such as oily fish, bananas, and tomatoes… This will help you to stay in a good mood. Avoid alcohol, as it increases feelings of sadness, and coffee, which intensifies anxiety.
  5. Smile! Spread your smile in the work environment. This will help increase your own productivity and the productivity of others.

Remember, the key to an energised and positive return after the holidays is your attitude and your outlook on things!

We hope these tips help you beat the blues!

Do leave a comment on how you dealt with the post-holiday experience. ;)

Guide to careers in translation: you’ll need more than just language skills!

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, Uncategorized and tagged , , on by Andres Herrera.

A successful translation career starts with language skills, but it certainly doesn’t end there. In fact, professional translation, whether you work freelance or for a translation company, requires a whole host of abilities as well as the actual translator skills. In this post, we’ll take a look at the translator skills you need and why they are important.

Career in translation

Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash.

Let’s start with the basics. What is a translation service? A translation service converts one language to another. The translation can be of a document, an audio file, a video file, or a spoken language event such as a presentation or webinar (i.e. interpretation services). Clearly, language skills play a key role in this. Without being able to speak two languages fluently, you won’t fare well as a translator.

However, there is a whole array of other skills that you need in order to translate well. The Open University’s course on Translation as a Career highlights this starkly when it lists the competencies required to make a good translator. Of the 15 skills listed, ‘excellent knowledge of the foreign language’ only places 12th on the list.

What skills do you need to translate professionally?

If you’re asking yourself, “What qualifications do I need to be a translator?” then it’s important to look beyond language. A formal qualification such as a language degree is an excellent and often essential starting point, but then it’s time to focus on soft skills.

How are your organisation skills? What about your attention to detail? Both of these will stand you in good stead if you want to translate professionally. You will need to be organised in your handling of individual translation jobs, as well as your approach to managing everything from clients to invoicing.

Attention to detail, of course, is a must when you work with language. A single mistranslated word can change the meaning of a sentence or, indeed, render it meaningless. And when it comes to medical translation, legal translation, and the like, a mistranslation can have significant consequences.

Excellent IT skills are also a must. Translation technology has a lot to offer when it comes to helping to translate more efficiently and accurately. Those who can quickly embrace the latest software will have a distinct advantage.

On a more traditional level, translators also need good, old-fashioned writing abilities! Writing for a living, whether it’s your own copy or the translation of someone else’s document, requires not just perfect spelling and grammar but also an instinctive feel for the flow of the languages that you’re working with.

Marketing your translation service

Networking skills are essential if you want to succeed in providing translation services for a living. You’ll need to find a steady stream of clients and then impress them with more than just language skills. Being personable and professional will help you to make the right connections and then develop them into relationships.

This need to network well applies no matter how you plan to market your translation service and obtain clients. Whether you’re going for work with a translation agency, through a freelancing site like Upwork, or by connecting with clients directly, you need to be able to build bridges and make them last.

Part of maintaining a client base is being flexible and adaptable. There are times when a client will realise far too late in the day that they need a translation urgently or will change their mind halfway through the translation job about some important detail that will impact the way the work needs to progress. In these cases, it is the translator who can flex their services and timescales who will end up retaining the client’s business over the longer term.

Sector-specific translation experience

Successful translators often bring a great deal of subject knowledge to the table as well. This allows them to specialise when they translate. That can involve offering anything from marketing translation to video translation – and anything and everything in between!

This specialist knowledge can help clients to laser-focus their translations in order to obtain the best possible results. Translators with plentiful experience of a particular sector can work faster and, arguably, more accurately than those who lack such specialist knowledge. This passes obvious benefits to the client.

Cultural awareness also comes into play here. Translators at the top of their game can gently mould the text that they work with to ensure that it perfectly meets the cultural expectations of the intended audience. It’s a skill that develops natively over time and is an essential part of successful professional translation.

Routes into translation as a career

Once you’ve got a language qualification under your belt, there are various routes into professional translation. You can apply directly for a job with a company that needs translation work completed regularly and so is hiring in-house. You can also apply to one or more translation agencies, in which case the agency will take care of the finding clients and billing elements of the work, leaving you free to focus purely on the translation.

Online job sites (Upwork, Fiverr, and the like) mean that you can also set out to find your own clients, albeit with a percentage of your income paid to the relevant site. You can also recruit clients directly through your professional network and word of mouth. If you plan to take this approach, a strong web presence will certainly be a help.

If you’re looking to stand out from the crowd when it comes to translation work, think about the additional skills that you can offer. From localisation to desktop publishing, there are skills that clients will be looking for over and above linguistic talent. If you can provide them, you’re already a step ahead of the competition.

Of course, we should end by pointing out that skill with language is and always will be a key factor in translating for a living. What languages are in high demand for translators? These will vary depending on where you are based. However, Ethnologue notes that English is the world’s largest language in terms of native and non-native speaker numbers, while Mandarin Chinese is the largest based on the number of native speakers. As such, if you’re wondering, “What is the best language to learn for translation?” these make a good starting point for your consideration!

Author: Paul Fernandez